Globalisation dissertation titles

What Is globalization?
Is it the integration of economic,globalization definition political, and cultural systems across the globe? Or is it the dominance of developed countries in decision-making, at the expense of poorer, less powerful nations? Is globalization a force for economic growth, prosperity, and democratic freedom? Or is it a force for environmental devastation, exploitation of the developing world, and suppression of human rights? Does globalization only benefit the rich or can the poor take advantage of it to improve their well-being?

Globalization and the impact of multinationals on local communities . Multinationals can impact upon communities in very diverse places. First, they look to establish or contract operations (production, service and sales) in countries and regions where they can exploit cheaper labour and resources. While this can mean additional wealth flowing into those communities, this form of ‘globalization’ entails significant inequalities. It can also mean large scale unemployment in those communities where those industries were previously located. The wages paid in the new settings can be minimal, and worker’s rights and conditions poor. For example, a 1998 survey of special economic zones in China showed that manufacturers for companies like Ralph Lauren, Adidas and Nike were paying as little as 13 cents per hour (a ‘living wage’ in that area is around 87 cents per hour). In the United States workers doing similar jobs might expect US$10 per hour (Klein 2001: 212).

Globalization is deeply controversial, however. Proponents of globalization argue that it allows poor countries and their citizens to develop economically and raise their standards of living, while opponents of globalization claim that the creation of an unfettered international free market has benefited multinational corporations in the Western world at the expense of local enterprises, local cultures, and common people. Resistance to globalization has therefore taken shape both at a popular and at a governmental level as people and governments try to manage the flow of capital, labor, goods, and ideas that constitute the current wave of globalization.

Associate Directors
David Bassens (Brussels)
Jon Beaverstock (Bristol)
Martijn Burger (Rotterdam)
Ben Derudder (Ghent)
James Faulconbridge (Lancaster)
John Harrison (Loughborough)
Michael Hoyler (Loughborough)
Xingjian Liu (Hong Kong)
Zachary Neal (Michigan State)
Kathy Pain (Reading)
Christof Parnreiter (Hamburg)
Allan Watson (Loughborough)
Frank Witlox (Ghent)

Email GaWC

Globalisation dissertation titles

globalisation dissertation titles

Associate Directors
David Bassens (Brussels)
Jon Beaverstock (Bristol)
Martijn Burger (Rotterdam)
Ben Derudder (Ghent)
James Faulconbridge (Lancaster)
John Harrison (Loughborough)
Michael Hoyler (Loughborough)
Xingjian Liu (Hong Kong)
Zachary Neal (Michigan State)
Kathy Pain (Reading)
Christof Parnreiter (Hamburg)
Allan Watson (Loughborough)
Frank Witlox (Ghent)

Email GaWC

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